Category Archives: Art

Patrick Commecy’s street art

Patrick Commecy’s street art

Many buildings has build with no aim to impress us. Ugly gray wall of the building is not something that pleases anybody’s eye and often makes the whole area of the town so unattractive. French street artist Patrick Commecy decided to fight back. His murals transform dull and boring facades around France into vibrant scenes full of life.

Conté crayons and pencils

Conté crayons and pencils

Named after Nicolas-Jacques Conté, who invented them in the eighteenth century, Conté crayons are made in a range of traditional colours: white (made from chalk), sanguine (from iron oxide), sepia (from the ink of the cuttlefish) and bistre (from the soot of burnt beech wood). Terracotta, umber and black are also available, as are sets that provide a range of greys and browns.

Hope Gangloff’s contemporary paintings

Hope Gangloff’s contemporary paintings

Hope Gangloff is known for creating vibrant and truthful portraits of her friends as a way to share her view of modern American life. By capturing this generation of young adults in her illustrations and paintings, she documents this era’s struggle during these tumultuous economic times. Gangloff studied fine art at Cooper Union in New York. After leaving art school, Gangloff worked in a bronze foundry and made illustrations for publications such as the New York Times, the New Yorker, Spin Magazine, and Built by Wendy. Her work now hangs in galleries and museums around the world.

Andy Goldsworthy’s land art

Andy Goldsworthy’s land art

Andy Goldsworthy, an internationally renowned land artist, was born in Cheshire in 1956. There are regular exhibitions of his work in Britain, France and the United States. Although he travels all over the world to carry out commissions, the landscape around his home in Dumfries, south-west Scotland, remains at the heart of his work.  

Create the Unique Envelopes

Create the Unique Envelopes

Do you like to send and receive letters? Real, paper and handwritten letters and cards? I think it is still sometimes the best way to communicate with people, because it shows that you really care. If you are a creative person and like to put your own mark on the things, making the unique, artistic envelopes can be a great fun. And the statement, too.

Dave Bain Artworks

Dave Bain Artworks

Dave Bain is a Bristol, UK-based illustrator, producing work for an eclectic range of commercial and independent clients. Working primarily in traditional mediums of paint and screen-printing, with an underlying emphasis on drawing, he has turned his hand to all manner of projects including shoe pattern design, children’s books, advertising, live drawing and large mural artwork.

Peter Clark’s collages

Peter Clark’s collages

Peter Clark uses a comprehensive collection of found papers as his palette which are coloured, patterned or textured by their printed, written or worn surfaces, with this media he ‘paints’ his collages. He shades with density of print and creates substance and movement with lines plucked from old maps or manuscripts. His pieces use mark-making in an innovative and humorous way to create.

Keira Rathbone – Artist/Typist

Keira Rathbone – Artist/Typist

Keira Rathbone, a British artist, is becoming known for her drawings made using old-style, mechanical typewriters. Apparently it is not a new thing in the world of art –   artists have been doing this since the 1940’s. Keira considers her work performance art, so she creates in public dressed like she is belong to  the same period as her typewriter. The final results are amazing. The process magically produces images that at first glance, look hand drawn.

Jun Kaneko: An Artist’s Portrait

Jun Kaneko: An Artist’s Portrait

Born and raised in Japan, Jun Kaneko moved to the United States to study ceramics. Not able to speak the language, he was forced to focus purely on the visual. His painting background is evident in his work, where his monolithic ceramic “dangos” (the Japanese word for dumpling) become three-dimensional, inflated canvases. Working primarily with graphic, yet painterly, lines and dots, his rhythmic designs are analogous with the Japanese Shinto concept of the “Ma”, which loosely translates into “attachment through space”.   He proceeded to study with Peter Voulkos, Paul Soldner, and Jerry Rothman in California during the time now defined as The Contemporary Ceramics Movement in America. The following decade, Jun Kaneko taught at some of the nation’s leading art schools, including Scripps College, Rhode Island School of Design and Cranbrook Academy of Art.

Cayce Zavaglia and her Embroidered Paintings

Cayce Zavaglia and her Embroidered Paintings

Cayce Zavaglia (1971) creates realistic impressions of people are executed using crewel embroidery wool, for which over time she has created a system
of sewing threads in a sequence that gives the appearance of a particular color or tone – her method of ‘mixing’ colors. Each piece is hand embroidery and in total Cayce Zavaglia has a developed 14 portraits so far.