Category Archives: Visual

Jane Foster’s Happy World

Jane Foster’s Happy World

Jane Foster is an illustrator living in UK. Her two main passions are screen printing and collecting vintage fabrics from the 50s, 60s and 70s. Her screen prints start off as ink drawings which are then added to screens for printing. She enjoys the process of drawing free hand and love combining screen printing with vintage fabrics.

Yoko Furusho Window Illustration Project

Yoko Furusho Window Illustration Project

V.O.W N°33 (22 – 28 August 2011)

There is no doubt that window displays are the most important component in any store. They not only form the brand’s image and grab customers’ attention but they have recently become the perfect medium through which a brand can tell a story to the public both quickly and efficiently.

Photography: Anton Corbijn

Photography: Anton Corbijn

Anton Corbijn has been at the top of his game as a photographer since the 1980s but, with two feature films under his belt, is establishing a reputation as a top-quality film director.

This photographer lives between showing himself and closing himself off to and from the world. It’s increasingly important for him to leave an impression of peoples’ sould. He knows fear of death from close up, and survival’s many facets. It’s important for him to not idealize, but to transform everything through the sieve of fantasy.

Minimiam: The New Yummy World

Minimiam: The New Yummy World

The husband and wife team, Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida, present a manufactured micro universe, part Toy Story, part Candy Land, populated with diminutive humanoid characters engaged in a range of ordinary and extraordinary activities. Since the project inception in 2002, the series has grown to over 60 images.

Liu Bolin: The Invisible Man

Liu Bolin: The Invisible Man

Inspired by how some animals can blend into their environment, Liu Bolin from China uses camouflage principles to create amazing contemporary art. His advanced camouflage art exploded onto the art scene as we were all left speechless, scratching our heads at how body paint could seamlessly blend a person into their background so perfectly. In his work, the artist is hiding to restore his strength and to protect himself. The goal is to represent the diminishing humanity in today’s society. Click here to see more of his amazing work.

British Pop Art: How it Started

British Pop Art: How it Started

Against a backdrop of post-war reconstruction and social change, a group of young artists, writers and architects met to pool their ideas at the Institute of contemporary Arts (ICA) in London. Formed in 1951 and known as the International Group (IG), they introduced the world to a new kind of art that was stimlated by popular culture – films, comics, advertising, science-fiction and pop music were key inspirations.

Peter Greenaway – Intervals (1969)

Peter Greenaway – Intervals (1969)

Peter Greenaway – Intervals (1969)

This early work of the brilliant director Peter Greenaway is a lovely gem of editing. It has a kind of mezmerizing quality, which you’ll notice as you listen to the sound intervals and Italian alphabet against the shots of Venice street life.

“Starburst: Color Photography In America 1970–1980″

“Starburst: Color Photography In America 1970–1980″

Black and white photography is such a relic of another age that it is hard to imagine, as recently as the 1970s, the art world’s hostility to color. William Eggleston’s Color Photographs, for example, the first one-man show of color work at the Museum of Modern Art in 1976, was considered the worst exhibit of the year. Hilton Kramer repudiated John Szarkowski, the museum’s curator of photography, for throwing caution to the wind when he spoke of Eggleston’s work as “perfect.” “Perfect?” Kramer wrote in The New York Times. “Perfectly banal, perhaps. Perfectly boring, certainly.” Of course Eggleston would become one of the most influential photographers of the era.

Andy Smith’s Graphic Work

Andy Smith’s Graphic Work

Andy Smith’s work embraces modern technology and he combines it with a knowledge of print techniques and drawing. His characters are a concoction of humour and events with a heavy pinch of strong typography and copywriting skills.

Having won multiple awards like the D&AD, AOI and Creative Circle awards and apart from his impressive client list, he delights us further on a tender night with a fine coctail of some of his self-published and beautifully illustrated silkscreen prints and books on his website.

Zac Freeman’s Recycling Art

Zac Freeman’s Recycling Art

Assemblage Series
1999-2011

“I started making assemblage artworks of this type in 1999. The artworks are made entirely out of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. I glue the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. I was interested in communicating through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. It is very important to me that I incorporate the actual objects into the art as opposed to a picture or rendition of it because it better expresses the intention of the artwork. I feel the junk is more powerful being present. It is an actual thing to be reckoned with that existed in this time and place and carries energy in and of itself.”