Category Archives: Textile

Modern Rugs: Emma At Home

Modern Rugs: Emma At Home

Emma Gardner designs beautiful things for the home. Her award-winning collections are infused with her uniquely American and contemporary point of view. Born in Kyoto, Japan to an English father and Russian-American mother, she grew up in New York City and now lives in Northern California. Asian themes, modern art and natural forms are all evident inspiration in the quality products under her emma gardner design and emma at home brands.

Kaffe Fassett Studio: A Designs for Joy and Happiness

Kaffe Fassett Studio: A Designs for Joy and Happiness

Kaffe Fassett has inspired people across the world with his colourful work in fabric, knitting, needlepoint, patchwork, painting and mosaic.

Kaffe Fassett was born in San Francisco in 1937. When he was 19, he won a scholarship to the Museum of Fine Arts School in Boston, but left after three months to paint in London. He settled in England in 1964.

Modern Fabrics in Your Home

Modern Fabrics in Your Home

The easiest way to bring life and light into your homes during the finishing touches is to use the right fabric designs. You spend a lot of money on things like wood, glass, marble and paints during the finishing touches, but forget to invest in fabric designs to add real finishing touches to your home.

Bennison Fabrics

Bennison Fabrics

Launched in 1985, Bennison Fabrics is the brainchild of Gilly Newbury, who once worked as the textiles assistant to the esteemed interior designer and antiques dealer Geoffrey Bennison.

How to Make a Crocheted Flowers

How to Make a Crocheted Flowers

If you like to decorate your accessories – hats, bags, belts, scarfs… – or put a nice detail on your dress or jacket, or make your cushions cute and warm, then crochet flowers are the must to learn.

The Aran Sweaters

The Aran Sweaters

Standing like immortal gatekeepers at the mouth of Galway Bay are the Aran Islands; three wind-swept and wave-beaten landmasses that rise from the sea in a stirring display of towering cliffs, craggy limestone pillars and crumbling stone walls. The islands themselves bear the marks of over 5,000 years of human activity – ranging from a mighty Iron Age fort to the many religious ruins left by early Christian settlers.

The Royal School of Needlework

The Royal School of Needlework

The Royal School of Needlework is unique in the field of hand embroidery and has a wealth of experience and expertise accumulated over more than 130 years.

The early history of the RSN is linked with the social, cultural and political history of Victorian and Edwardian Britain. The RSN began as the School of Art Needlework in 1872 founded by Lady Victoria Welby. The first President was Princess Christian of Schleswig-Holstein, Queen Victoria’s third daughter, known to the RSN as Princess Helena.

How to Date the Quilt?

How to Date the Quilt?

One important part of appraising a quilt or any textile is accurate dating. Sometimes there is no doubt of the date, because the maker embriodered it onto the quilt or wrote it somewhereon the back in indelible ink. Sometimes a quilt was so obviously designed for a special occasions – such as the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago – that its date can be easily ascertained.

Most of the quilts that are available for collecting were made in the 19th and 20th centuries, although it is possible to find an earlier treasure for sale or maybe even in your own attic. However, unless there is a direct connection to the maker, the dating of quilts is not precise science. It is more like a mixture of detective work and educated guessing.

The Story of the Shawl

The Story of the Shawl

Many people are unaware of the rich heritage behind the shawl.This piece of clothing or understand what is the shawl. Shawls have been used worldwide and in different cultures with different purposes, from decorations for religious purposes.

People in modern times been used for decades as the shawl both fashionable and functional for several purposes. The shawl and again the waves on the fashion industry as a costume accessory and elegant or stylish dresses. Besides this, there was always shawls features because they can be used to cover the head, neck and face as a protection against the elements or a heat source.

The Batik – A Bit of Theory and Practice

The Batik – A Bit of Theory and Practice

Batik is a resist method of patterning cloth. The principle of all resist techniques is that a “resist” substance, such as wax or starch paste, is applied to the surface of the cloth to prevent the dye from penetrating to those areas when the fabric is placed in the dyebath. Therefore, when the waxed cloth is removed from the dyebath the areas that have been coated with wax retain their original colour, while the unwaxed areas take on a new hue.

Some theories suggest that batik originated in China between 474BC and 221BC and that the art then spread eastward to Japan. Today, batik is practised in many parts of the world, including India, Africa, South-East Asia and Europe. However, one island, Java, is at the heart of batik design. Javanese batiks have come to be regarded as among the most beautiful and sought-after pieces in the world.