Tag Archives: crafts

History of creative wirework

History of creative wirework

Wirework is an ancient art form, probably first practised by the Egyptians around 3000BC. Early examples have been discovered in the burial chambers of important people throughout the ancient world. In 2600BC, wire was used in gold and silver ribbons for entwining in the hair of courtly ladies in the Sumerian city of Ur. The art of wirework spread in various forms from Babylon to Baghdad, Damascus and Constantinople before finally reaching Europe.

Catnip mouse

Catnip mouse

Filled with catnip, this little mouse make a delightful gift that a cat literally cannot resist. This is a great project for using up offcuts and leftover pieces of material. Cotton fabrics work well, but why not also try tweed or leather? Catnip or Nepeta cataria is cultivated as an ornamental plant for use in gardens. It is also grown for its attractant qualities to house cats and butterflies. With domestic cats, catnip is used as a recreational substance for pet cats’ enjoyment, and catnip and catnip-laced products designed for use with domesticated cats are available to consumers. Common behaviors cats display when they sense the bruised leaves or stems of catnip are rubbing on the plant, rolling on the ground, pawing at it, licking it, and chewing it. 

Button napkin holder

Button napkin holder

Button napkin holders look lovely tied around  coloured linen and are a simple way to introduce your key wedding colours into your reception table scheme. Thread a few buttons onto a length of jewelry wire, using different sizes and colours. Turn each end over so they are not sharp. The lovely thing about buttons is the variety of looks you can create – for a folksy, muted palette, combine leather and bone – coloured buttons or, if you want sparkle, use diamanté encrusted pieces.

Decoupage technique

Decoupage technique

Découpage is the craft of decorating an object with paper cutouts glued in place. If you take the time to apply many coats of varnish over the paper cutouts, they will appear to sink into the surface and will look as though they are part of the object and not merely stuck on. 

Box-making Technique

Box-making Technique

Box-making is also known by the French term “cartonnage” and covers  variety of techniques. In its simplest form, this craft consists of cutting a form from flat card using a template, cutting out the shape, scoring and folding, then assembling it into a box. Gift boxes are readily available from stationer and craft shops but it’s much more fun – and cheaper – to make your own.

Willow Fruit Basket

Willow Fruit Basket

This quick and simple project uses brown willow to make a frame basket. The basket is woven around the cardboard former which holds the basket in shape while you concentrate on the weaving. once you’ve mastered the basic weave you can enjoy watching the piece takes shape. This basket makes a great basket or looks good as a sculptural piece hung on a wall.

Set of Coasters

Set of Coasters

Make this fun set of fruit-themed coasters using plain white ceramic bathroom or kitchen tiles. All four coasters require the same techniques – it is just the design that changes. You can always add more designs if you like to have a set of six or eight coasters, but we can advise you to stick to simple shapes and designs or just repeat those shown in this article.

Plaster-dipped silk flowers and plastic fruit

Plaster-dipped silk flowers and plastic fruit

This project is very interesting for adults as much as for children. Dipping silk flowers and plastic fruit in fine plaster results in very unusual and unique home decoration. Make your own arrangements of the all elements of the project and you will get an excellent piece of art on the end, though the result may be unexpected.

How to Make a 3-D Globes?

How to Make a 3-D Globes?

It is a slightly sad that in the age of Google maps, GPS systems and navigation tools that can pinpoint your exact location at any given time, good old globes are becoming obsolete. Back in time, every school child was growing up with a desktop globe. It was a great help at school but also a great fun – spin it as fast as could, close the eyes and stop it with the finger. Wherever the finger landed was where the child is going to travel when grew up. What an exotic places would be on your bucket list.

Eva Behar’s Pottery

Eva Behar’s Pottery

In 1991 Eve Behar took her first ceramics class and, like a lot of people who work in clay, got hooked. She continued to take classes in college and then at adult education centers while starting a career in television production. Ceramics as a hobby proved not to be enough for Eve, so in 1995 she took a break from working and went to Florence for a year to study at the Studio Art Center International.