Category Archives: Textile

Shifu Weaver Hiroko Karuno

Shifu Weaver Hiroko Karuno

During Japan’s Edo period (1603 – 1868), in what is now the country’s northern Miyagi Prefecture, hand-made paper was woven into a cloth so supple, lightweight and refined that one of the area’s most powerful clans paid tribute to the shogun by presenting him with garments made from this luxurious paper cloth known as shifu. Woven from a paper weft against a silk warp, the production of shifu was tightly controlled and its process a well-guarded secret.

Art Quilts by Anna Torma

Art Quilts by Anna Torma

Anna Torma was born in 1952, Tarnaors, Hungary. Her interest in working with textiles goes back to early childhood when she learned to sew, knit, crochet and embroider from her mother and grandmothers. Not an unusual start for the future textile artist. But, Anna is treating the textile as the tool for creating a complex surface designs deeply meaningful and inspirative.

Jacquard, brocade and damask – what is the difference?

Jacquard, brocade and damask – what is the difference?

Oft times, the terms brocade, damask, and jacquard, get used interchangeably, which, to be fair is understandable – they’re all relatively similar. However, it can help to understand the difference between them and how they relate to one another.

Candace Hicks’s Embroidered Books

Candace Hicks’s Embroidered Books

Formerly a house painter, bounty hunter, and au pair, Candace Hicks has spent most of her life in her home state of Texas (except three years in Paris, France, not Paris, Texas. She has never been to Paris, Texas, but she grew up in a small town named for another cultural seat: Athens, Texas!).

Trish Raine’s Handmade Felt Hats

Trish Raine’s Handmade Felt Hats

Originally from Oliver, B.C., Trish Raine moved to Fredericton, NB, and happily found footing within the local fibre scene. Outside of her work as an occupational therapist, she has immersed herself in her craft, felting in her free time, creating one-of-a-kind wearable felt, as well as art pieces that have been included in various art and fibre shows. She felts year round and sells her wares at winter craft fairs in Halifax, Nova Scotia, as well as Moncton and Fredericton, New Brunswick.

Rebecca Ringquist embroidery art

Rebecca Ringquist embroidery art

Rebecca Ringquist is a Brooklyn-based visual artist and designer. Her stitched drawings on fabric explore issues of identity through thinly veiled metaphors utilizing old fashioned imagery and double entendres. She learned how to embroider in college in a feminist art history class, and has been inspired by the history of American needlework ever since. Approaching the technique of embroidery as a way of drawing, Ringquist has taught hundreds of people new ways of making marks on fabric through classes and workshops around the country.

How to Make a Chevron Friendship Bracelet?

How to Make a Chevron Friendship Bracelet?

Way back when we could make friendship bracelets with our eyes closed. Here is a reminder for the older generations and something very new for today’s teenagers. The friendship bracelets are amazing fun to make and it is a great gift to your BFF or siblings.

The Tapestry Artist Urban Jupena

The Tapestry Artist Urban Jupena

Urban Jupena is an American artist. At the Philadelphia College (now University) of Art he was attracted to weaving and fiber art. After that he attended Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, where he received his MFA in 1970. Working under Robert Kidd, he was involved into the commission fiber art for homes and public spaces.

Toggle Owl Bookmarks

Toggle Owl Bookmarks

These brilliant owl bookmarks with toggle tops mean you will never lose your place or your bookmark. These clever, brightly coloured owls really pop out against the black aida, while the brilliant toggle tops stop the bookmarks from slipping out of the book and getting lost.

Textile project: How to Sponge?

Textile project: How to Sponge?

Sponging is a simple and effective method of adding texture to the cloth, and produces excellent results when using as the background for other decorative finishes such as stencilling or block printing. However, this technique does not have to be carried out with the sponge – you can create similar effects by printing with screwed-up pieces of cloth or kitchen paper.