A Short Story About Cufflinks

Having cufflinks have always been connected men who are dressed with style and elegancy. Before the cufflinks and clothes in general started to be the result of mass production, in the late 20th century, the shirts were tailor made and tailors created the cufflinks and process allowed them to be very creative.

During the 16th century shirts started to develop along the lines of the garment we enjoy today. The desire to have a fastened wrist band that still permitted the wearer to put on the garment necessitated some means of closing the cuff after it was in place. The ornate ruffled wrist bands of those times were joined by ‘cuff strings’ often brightly coloured ribbons.

It was the French that developed the “Cuff Link” as we know it today. During the reign of King Louis XIV the “boutons de manchette” or sleeve buttons became fashionable. The first known were constructed using two identical glass buttons joined by a short linked chain. By 1715 jeweled studs of diamonds were connected by gold chains or links and so the ‘Cuff Link’ was finally born.

 

17th century cufflinks

The double or French cuffs are almost always attached by cuff links. The “kissing cuff” has the cuffs aligned and has become more popular than the barrel cuff where one cuff overlaps the other.

Nowadays there are many more styles of attachment than the doubles with chain links. In the early 20th century in the USA the dumbbell or shank style became popular. With the coming of the industrial revolution manufacturing techniques enabled the mass production of cuff links which meant that the middle classes could afford them and their popularity increased. Perhaps the most technically advanced attachment is the swivel. This has a shaft that aligns with the post as it is threaded through the button holes and then pivoted at a right angle to the post when inserted.

Having cufflinks have always been connected men who are dressed with style and elegancy. Before the cufflinks and clothes in general started to be the result of mass production, in the late 20th century, the shirts were tailor made and tailors created the cufflinks and process allowed them to be very creative.

On today’s market dominate peg button shirts, but cufflink remains popular. Beside wearing rings and tie clips, the cuff link is the most favourite other piece of jewellery for  men. The cufflinks  can be a of different style – funny, e.g with clubs and hearts or the jack of diamonds or they can be classic and elegant bringing us back to the  times when only the higher-class men were able to dress with such finery.

 

One Response to A Short Story About Cufflinks

  1. cuff link says:

    Since 16th century cuff link are popular and now they cuff link are so popular that all men cant go without it.

    thanks
    http://www.cufflinksempire.com.au/

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